Writing professional emails are not so formal as professional letters, but they are definitely turning in that direction

Most students are already familiar with using email to catch up with friends and family. However, writing a formal professional email might feel awkward or even foreign to you at first. Writing professional emails are not so formal as professional letters, but they are definitely turning in that direction. Using Markel’s 6 characteristics of technical communications, clarity, conciseness, and correctness are the essentials. Following these guidelines, write a formal email: Use a professional email address Use a descriptive subject line (describe the contents of the message) Use a salutation (generally, the most accepted is “Dear….” Write a clear purpose statement as your opening. Follow your purpose statement with the actual message (however, be sure to keep a professional tone and avoid writing in an overly informal way. Use a closing line (generally, the most accepted is “Sincerely…” but others might be “Respectfully…” “Cordially…” or even “Best wishes,” Sign with your full name Add a signature block below your name (use this for a title, address, or other means of identifying yourself) Part 1

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